God's Purposes Are Always Personal

God's Purposes Are Always Personal

The days leading up to Mother’s Day can be hard. Even though I am no longer a barren woman, I still struggle with my own difficulties and guilt as Mother’s Day approaches. For the infertile or the mother struggling with loss, Mother’s Day is acutely difficult. It’s almost as if everything around you is reminding you of what you don’t have—what you long for but can’t have. And it can be painfully isolating.

The barren women of scripture didn’t have a national holiday to remind them of their lack, but they surely had their fill of individuals (Gen. 16:1-5, 1 Sam. 1:4-9). One person’s celebration is often the seat of another’s deep pain. The pages of scripture are filled with women who longed for wombs to bear children, who longed for children to be restored to health and wholeness, of women in deep pain over grief.

How Rest and Generosity Go Together

How Rest and Generosity Go Together

“Sometimes one of the most spiritual things you can do is sleep,” or so the saying goes. It’s been the constant refrain in my mind this past year as I’ve struggled to find rest, and more importantly, sleep. I want to be spiritual. I want to grow in godliness. I want to be kind to my family. And so often I find myself up against my inability to sleep, which then leads to a host of other problems.

True Confessions in At-Home Work

True Confessions in At-Home Work

One of the dangers in writing a book is the perception that the author has somehow arrived in living out the message of the book. As I’ve said before, writing is something I’m learning to do before I’ve arrived. Otherwise I would never write. As Glory in the Ordinary is now officially out to the public, I am reminded again just how much I have not arrived on the “finding purpose in at-home work” front. So, lest anyone think I wrote the book from a place of strength and domestic prowess, I hope this post helps settle that notion once and for all.

Shedding Light on Unseen Work: My Hope for the Book

Shedding Light on Unseen Work: My Hope for the Book

It’s book launch week for Glory in the Ordinary! One of the primary reasons I wrote the book is because I believe that all work (paid and unpaid) brings glory to God. God made us to work. He works and we image him in our work in the world that he has made. But I also know that I’m a product of a culture that places value on certain types of work, namely paid or higher paid work. I don’t do a lot of paid work in a given day. Maybe you are like me. Your days consist of just as much work as your husband or friend who work in the marketplace, but for the most part people don’t see what you are doing. The impact of your work is long-term, so it’s hard to quantify how it contributes anything good to society (unless you measure in years, not days and weeks).

Glory in the Ordinary Book Launch, Giveaways, and FB Live!

Glory in the Ordinary Book Launch, Giveaways, and FB Live!

It’s almost time for “Glory in the Ordinary” to launch! I’m so excited to share this book with you and pray the Lord uses it in your life. The official release date is April 30, but next week is the launch week. We (Crossway and myself) have a lot of fun things planned for this week, starting with THREE Facebook Live events!

Write Before You've Arrived

Write Before You've Arrived

The process of writing is such an up and down experience for me. As I prepare to launch my second book out into the world, I have been reflecting on the nature of writing, the difficulty of writing, and the reality that so often when we write (or teach in general), we are writing before we’ve arrived. And that’s a good thing.

When I write, I am painfully aware of my sin. I see how I don’t measure up. I don’t always do what I am calling others to. Instead, I feel like a fraud. My words seem unclear. I want to be faithful, but it doesn’t “feel” faithful. Are these questions and fear unique to me? I am sure not. The human experience is a universal one, so I imagine that by throwing this out there, insecurities and all, there will at least be one writer/teacher who wonders these very things. Or at least, I hope so.

The Fearful Pregnancy

The Fearful Pregnancy

It’s not the baby that scares me, it’s all that could go wrong. And with my history, I have had enough go wrong to know that even a growing baby and strong heartbeat don't guarantee a positive outcome. Looking down the mountain of pregnancy, I know there is only one way out of this thing. I will deliver this baby either in a rush of exhilarating joy, or a rush of grief. It sounds morbid, but of all the things that I’ve faced in my life, pregnancy is one that has scared me most. I spend the better part of nine (more like ten) months in a moderate state of panic.

A Day for All Women (Not Just the Privileged)

A Day for All Women (Not Just the Privileged)

I’m usually pretty behind on the news, though this week I’ve been paying attention to the A Day Without a Woman strike set to happen today. The organizers of the strike are calling on women to either refrain from shopping, wear red, or stay home from paid or unpaid work. While they acknowledge this is not a possibility for many women (and say that they strike for those women, too), it strikes (no pun intended) me as a fairly privileged event—and therefore not for all women. 

When Women Learn From Each Other

When Women Learn From Each Other

Last year I was asked who the most influential Christian woman was in my life. I was sitting at a table with a bunch of other women, and as I listened to them recount women (some well-known, many not), I felt a little silly about my own answer—Elisabeth Elliot. I don’t know her. I’ve never met her. Over the years, I’ve read nearly everything she has ever written, but I only know her in the context of her books. Besides that, I’m in the dark.

Like many in our connected, Internet age, I have been discipled by women (and men) whom I do not actually know.